Baby being examined by nurses at Edmonton's baby clinic, December 16, 1947

City of Edmonton Archives

Baby be Well; In Defence of Alberta

The Edmonton Local Board of Health focused its programs on children and infants recognizing that a healthy beginning in early childhood helped children survive and prosper. The 1913 Annual Report of the Health Department argued that "the appointment of a visiting nurse whose duty would be to visit the homes of all recently born children to offer such advice as might be needed in the feeding and rearing of the infant, is strongly recommended and would undoubtedly result in a lowering of death rate among infants." The City acted upon this recommendation and later annual reports confirmed the importance of education in the reduction of infant death. The 1917 Annual Report of the Health Department records that "the baby clinic instituted by and held under the auspices of the Journal Newspaper during the last two years, have undoubtedly done a great deal to stimulate interest in the question of Infant Welfare and were of great benefit to the mothers and others who took advantage of the invitation to attend these clinics." This sentiment was echoed in the 1919 Annual Report of the Health Department: "the employment of a child welfare nurse as an employee working under the health department, I cannot recommend too strongly as being certain to lower our death rate among children under one year of age."

Baby being examined by nurses at Edmonton's baby clinic, December 16, 1947.

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